Each course is priced at $250.00 per graduate credit. THE COST OF EACH 3 GRADUATE CREDIT COURSE IS $750.00.
PLEASE call us with any questions:          JENMARC: 508.586.3574

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Updated on 9-4-2014


           
Psychology
            EPSY 525 - Advanced Multicultural Competencies for Teachers, Counselors and Administrators                      
            EPSY 526 - Substance Abuse Counseling                   
            EPSY 527 - Advanced Child and Adolescent Development                
            EPSY 528- Family and Group Counseling
            EPSY 529 - Adolescent Development
            EPSY 532 – Child-Centered Issues in 21st Century Classrooms
            EPSY 533 – Counseling Immigrant Children

   
Physical Education
            EDPH 527 - Applied Sports and Fitness Psychology
            EDPH 528 - Advanced Theories of Coaching and Team Building
            EDPH 529 - Current Issues in Sports and Physical Education
            EDPH 530 - Developing Student Athletes: Theory and Practice
Art
            EDAR 527 - Early Medieval Art
            EDAR 526 - History of Women in the Visual Arts
            EDAR 534 - Impressionist Art from France to America
            EDAR 535 - Methodologies of Art Analysis
English
            EDEN 526 - Literature, Culture, and War in the Twentieth Century
            EDEN 527 - Contemporary American Fiction
            EDEN 525 - Victorian Poetry
            EDEN 536 - Romantic Poets: The First Generation - Wordsworth and Coleridge
History
            EDHS 530 - Democracy in America
            EDHS 528 - The USA in World War II
            EDHS 529 - United States History from 1865 to Present
            EDHS 531 – God, Terror and History: When Religion Becomes Evil
            EDHS 538 - The Vietnam War
            EDHS 566 - Catastrophes in American History

Mathematics
            MTH 501 – Mathematics Across the Curriculum
            MTH 545 – Developing Mathematical Ideas in Number and Operations
            MTH 579 – Developing Mathematical Ideas Through Applications
            EDMA 525 – Calculus AB for Educators
           EDMA 530 – Mathematical Problem Solving
           MTH 126 – Applied Statistics (Undergrad)


On-Line Content Course Descriptions

Psychology

EPSY 525 – Advanced Multicultural Competencies for Teachers, Counselors and Administrators
The purpose of this course is to enhance cultural competence among professionals by fostering congruent behaviors, attitudes, and policies that come together in a system, agency, or among professionals and enables that system, agency, or those professionals to work effectively in cross-cultural situations. Operationally defined, the purpose of this course is to facilitate the integration and transformation of knowledge about individuals and groups of people into specific standards, policies, practices, and attitudes used in appropriate cultural settings to increase the quality of services; thereby producing better outcomes.
                                                               
EPSY 526 - Substance Abuse Counseling
Substance abuse etiology, assessment, diagnosis, and treatment planning are studied in this course. Special counseling issues and concerns will be covered related to various aspects of substance abuse counseling.       

EPSY 527 - Advanced Child and Adolescent Development   

This course deals with development of children and adolescents from birth to early adulthood. It covers the periods of infancy, early childhood, childhood, early adolescence, mid-adolescence, late adolescence and early adulthood. Attention is given to the influence of the go, cognitive social, emotional, moral, and sexual development on the psychology of learning, student achievement, and on understanding the diagnosis of potential learning disorders and issues at each stage. Both normal and abnormal aspects of development are discussed.
                               
EPSY 528 - Family and Group Counseling               
This course will focus on understanding human interaction patterns and influences from the perspective of major family and group therapy paradigms. Consideration of family treatment for both adult and child clinical presentations will be examined as well as an exploration of the use of group therapy to effect change for individual problems. In addition to the theoretical introduction, the curse will cover practical topics such as: when to choose family or group treatment, dealing with the beginning therapist’s anxieties, assessing interactional styles, structuring initial treatment sessions, developing a treatment focus, and basic treatment skills.

EPSY 529- Adolescent Development
Adolescence is a fascinating time of life from a developmental perspective because of the many physical and psychological changes that occur.  Popular wisdom considers adolescence to be a time of turmoil and crisis, but is that really an accurate description? In order to better inform counselor, teachers and administrators in this advanced course we will examine adolescence as a developmental phase.  We will examine biological changes such as puberty and brain development, cognitive and moral development, changes in parent and peer relationships, sexuality, gender, cultural context, and ethnicity.  Problems of adolescence, such as drug use, eating disorders, suicide, violence, and teen pregnancy will be covered, but normal development will be emphasized.

EPSY 532- Child-Centered Issues in the 21st Century Classroom
This course specializes in dealing with a variety of present child-centered issues. It will focus on child development, learning environments, and the internal and external factors dealt with by the 21st century student. Topics to be covered include, but are not limited to, multi-cultural and multi-ethnic education, abused children, mainstreaming, self-esteem, and family teacher relationships. 

EPSY 533- Counseling Immigrant Children
The immigrant population of urban communities has grown in recent years, creating new challenges for counselors. Counseling intervention is essential to enable immigrant students to cope with the stresses of immigration and the effects of those stresses on their academic performance. Acculturation is a process that changes with time and that affects students of different ages differently. Cultural variations among immigrants affect social and academic performance in school as well. Developing English language fluency both accompanies and is accompanied by other adjustment issues. Counselors can facilitate both student' adjustment and the schools recognition of immigrant students' cultural perspective and particular needs to be successful.


Physical Education

EDPH 527 - Applied Sports and Fitness Psychology
The course is designed to help the student apply concepts in sport and fitness psychology to real world experience as an athlete, coach, fitness instructor, parent, or teacher. Emphasis is placed on application of theories and ideas in sport psychology, rather than exploring theory alone.

EDPH 528 - Advanced Theories of Coaching and Team Building
This course will help you use effective coaching and team-building tools in sports, whether you are a professional coach, a high school coach, a youth sports coach, a club coach, or an athlete. It will also show you how these tools can be used in a variety of situations in your life – including in business and in family life. This course helps the student to learn new ways to manage a variety of challenges that come from working with people.

EDPH 529 - Current Issues in Sports and Physical Education
This course examines contemporary issues and controversies in the world of sports today. This includes topics such as violence in sports, race and ethnicity in sports, economics issues related to sports, youth sports, sports and the media, sports and politics, performance-enhancing substances, and sports and religion. The course will provide in-depth analysis of these topics and ask students to explore their views on these issues.

EDPH 530 - Developing Student Athletes: Theory and Practice
This course is designed to provide the student with knowledge and experiences in counseling and helping skills with an emphasis on traditional counseling theory and skills. The major modalities covered will include examples of Psychoanalytic, Neo-analytic, Person-centered, Humanistic, and Affective, Behavioral, Cognitive, and Family Systems therapies. This course will utilize an eclectic approach to developing intervention strategies for dealing with psychological, emotional, relationship, and adjustment problems for the student athlete.

 

Art

EDAR 526 - Early Medieval Art
The course surveys the visual culture of the early medieval West, from the turn of the seventh century until the middle of the eleventh, including the church decoration, illuminated manuscripts, and other works of art made in the lands that are now Italy, Spain, Switzerland, France, Germany, England, and Ireland.
From the world of Gregory the Great to the dynasty of Otto the Great, the course will seek first and foremost to develop the student’s ability to look closely and intensively at visual material and will cultivate associated skills, such as spatial reasoning, the observation of details, visual recall, the recognition of patterns, and visual differentiation. The course will also seek to develop art historical skills, such as the precise description of the form and content, the recognition of traditional and innovative elements in a work of art, the discernment of program, and the placement of a work of art against the background of the moment of its creation through the meaningful interrelating of image and text.

EDAR 527 - History of Women in the Visual Arts
This course covers the history of women as artists in the European and American traditions. Art by women in non-western cultures will also be studied, together with related issues such as images of women and feminist art analysis.

EDAR 534 - Impressionist Art from France to America
The France of the mid to late 1800ís gave birth to a group of revolutionary artists who were given the name of the Impressionists. These painters endured the rejection of the French art establishment to eventually change the world of art forever. After the Civil War, American artists traveled to Europe to study and exhibit their work. Many of these Americans met the French Impressionist painters and learned their painting techniques. Some Americans chose to stay in France to paint, while others brought their own brand of Impressionism back home to America. In this course, students will explore the artistic and social consequences of Impressionism from France to America.


EDAR 535     Methodologies of Art AnalysisBeginning in the nineteenth century, art history became an established academic discipline.  Throughout the evolution of the field, works of art have been interpreted in a variety of ways, known as the methodologies of artistic analysis. Every work of art is an expression of its culture and its creator, and is dependent on its context. The methodologies discussed here—formal analysis, biography and autobiography, iconology and iconography, psychoanalysis, race and gender, among others—reflect the multitude of meanings in an artistic work. Because art can be interpreted in a variety of ways, this course surveys the methodologies and approaches to artistic analysis used by art historians, philosophers, and critical observers.

English

EDEN 526 - Literature, Culture, and War in the Twentieth Century
This is a course about war and culture, with a focus on twentieth-century England and America. Our primary concern is to consider how literary forms have developed to make sense of the twentieth century's mass wars, how wars are remembered and forgotten, and how war has been adapted to the dominant aesthetic and cultural movements of the century. The bulk of our readings will center on the First World War, primarily from the British perspective, and on the Vietnam War, primarily from the American perspective, but we will also read material from the Second World War and from more recent conflicts such as the first Persian Gulf War. Issues of national identity, memory, gender, irony, and protest will be at the forefront of our inquiry. We will read both combatant and civilian writers, and our readings will be drawn from a variety of genres, including fiction, poetry, memoir, film, cultural studies, and theory.

EDEN 527 - Contemporary American Fiction
This course examines a selection of contemporary American fiction in historic, aesthetic, and social contexts.   In other words, we will explore the relationship between contemporary American literature and the world we live in.  Topics may include literature and postmodern culture, how aesthetic style may be influenced by social and historical conditions, the blurring of fact and fiction in contemporary literature, and how literature is affected by issues of race, class, and gender.  While the range of contemporary American fiction is extremely broad and varied, and impossible to cover in one semester, students will become acquainted with several of the major trends in American literature since 1965.  The course is divided into three main units:  1) post W.W.II and postmodernism; 2) new journalism and popular culture; 3) issues of race, gender and family. As students will discover, these categories are not mutually exclusive. They overlap and intersect one another.

EDEN 525 - Victorian Poetry

This course examines the works of the major English poets of the period 1830-1900. We will pay special attention to Alfred Tennyson and Robert Browning, and their great poetic innovation, the dramatic monologue. We will also be concentrating on poems by Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Gerard Manley Hopkins, Christina Rossetti, Matthew Arnold, A. E. Housman, and Thomas Hardy.

EDEN 536 – Romantic Poets: The First Generation – Wordsworth and Coleridge
This course covers the concept of romanticism as first developed and then expanded by the two British poets William Wordsworth and Samuel Taylor Coleridge.  Writing at the end of the eighteenth century and the beginning of the nineteenth century, Wordsworth and Coleridge lived during a time of great cultural and social changes, many of which will be covered in this course work.  Both men created a literary theory that was developed by later romantic poets, influenced writers on both sides of the Atlantic, and set the direction for contemporary thought.

History

EDHS 530 - Democracy in America
This course considers the history of politics and government in the United States by examining the history of American democracy in theory and practice. To what extent have American politics and government been democratic? What does the history of democracy in America suggest about the future of politics and society in the United States and the world? This course will examine the rise of parties and mass politics, machine politics and reform movements, the history of citizenship and suffrage as relates to race, ethnicity, and gender, the relationship between war and democracy, and the problem of reconciling democratic ideals with social and economic inequalities.

EDHS 528 - The USA in World War II
What was the nature of the relationship between Rosie the Riveter and GI Joe? Using the U.S. experience in World War II as its focus, this course encourages students to participate in new approaches to the historical study of warfare by challenging traditional divisions between home front and battle front. We will investigate the connections and conflict between soldiers and civilians, as well as their divergent and shared experiences.

EDHS 529 - United States History from 1865 to Present
This course provides students with an introduction to the field of U.S. History since 1865. It is intended to give students the broad foundation required for them to understand and practice outstanding historical scholarship. Readings include some of the most important recent works in the field. They also suggest the diverse range of topics and sources used, and research methods and narrative strategies that are employed by highly respected historians.
Because of its topical and chronological scope, this course will prepare students to become better scholars of American history. The overview it provides will be invaluable in forming a more complete understanding of American history.

EDHS 531 – God, Terror and History: When Religion Becomes Evil
This course will examine the growing alliance between religion and violence from a historical, political and sociological perspective. Religion seems to be connected with violence everywhere. The September 11 assaults were only the most spectacular of a series of bloody religious incidents. In recent years, for example, religious violence has erupted among right wing Christians in the United States, Angry Muslims and Jews in the Middle East and indigenous religious communities in Africa and Indonesia and in other parts of the world.  Like the activists associated with Osama bin Laden, those involved in these events have relied on religion to provide political identities that give license to vengeful ideologies.

EDHS 538 – The Vietnam War
The Vietnam War created one of the most divisive eras in United States’ history.  What began as a noble cause ended as a painful defeat politically, socially and emotionally. This course will examine the impact and legacy of the war as told by the many people involved.

EDHS 566 – Catastrophes in American History
This course is an in-depth examination of the many shocking, tragic and lurid events that have altered the course of politics and history.  Emphasis will be placed on the unique character of the U.S. Constitution and its ability to guide our nation through its most difficult times. 

Mathematics
MTH 501 – Mathematics Across the Curriculum
Participants will have the opportunity to understand the methodologies necessary to teach math at all levels. Participants will explore the internet, complete reading assignments, and hands-on activities. The participants will have the opportunity to use this new found knowledge to develop new and exciting lesson/s that can be used in your classes the next day. Participants will read and review specific readings from the internet and other resources that will allow them to have a better understanding of how to teach math across the curriculum. Participants will complete independent research and write a research paper, utilizing resources stated in course assignments. Course assignments will reflect the level of students you are teaching.

MTH 545 – Developing Mathematical Ideas, Numbers and Operations
This course is designed to deepen teachers’ pedagogical content knowledge in the Number and Operations mathematical strand. The content of this course supports standards-based mathematics programs. Teachers will explore the base ten structure of the number system, consider place value in computational procedures, and examine how concepts of whole numbers reappear when working with decimals. Through activities such as reading cases about elementary mathematics in classroom settings, viewing videotapes, doing mathematics, analyzing student work, and reading current research applicable to these issues teachers will learn more mathematics content for themselves, recognize key mathematical ideas with which students are grappling, appreciate the power and complexity of student thinking, analyze activities to uncover the mathematics students will learn from it, define and select mathematical objectives for their students, and learn how to continue learning about children and mathematics.

MTH 579 – Developing Mathematical Ideas With Applications


This course is designed to support a standards-based math program in grade 1-6 and 5-12 classrooms. The combination of math-based content is designed to help teachers use inquiry-based learning to deepen understanding of mathematics. The syllabus appropriately references “standards-based math program”, as a mathematics curriculum that reflects the content of the Math Framework, must address the standards detailed in the document and the standards articulated in the National Council of teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) Principles and Standards for School Mathematics. The phrase “inquiry based” captures the essence of the Guiding Philosophy and Guiding Principles of the Framework that espouse “…requires the (problem) solver to search for a method…”, “making and testing mathematical conjectures …”, “activities should build on curiosity and prior knowledge…”

EDMA 525 – Calculus AB for Educators
The goal of this course is to help teachers develop their students’ geometric insight into the concepts of differentiation and integration, and to apply these concepts to problem solving and “real world” applications. Course content will focus on the differentiation of algebraic and transcendental functions, applications of the derivative, differentials, indefinite integrals, definite integrals.

EDMA 530 – Mathematical Problem Solving

This course will concentrate on solving, or attempting to solve, mathematics problems.  How can one implement problem solving goals into the solution of his/her problem?  The emphasis is on exploration of various mathematics contexts to learn mathematics, to pose problems and problem extensions, to solve problems and to communicate mathematical demonstrations.  The problems will come from many sources.  Inquiry, investigation, exploration will be significant tactics to solve a variety of mathematics problems. 

MTH 126 – Applied Statistics (This is an Undergraduate Course)
Introduces the student to applied statistical methods used in industry and scientific applications. Emphasis will be on the practical aspects as students use descriptive and inferential statistics to analyze real data in applications of hypothesis testing, ANOVA, and linear regression and correlation. 

Please call the office with any questions: 508.586.3574